instagram

instagram:

Hunting for the Perfect Christmas Tree

Want to see photos and videos of amazing Christmas trees from around the world? Be sure to visit the Parque Lagoa Rodrigo de Freitas, Trafalgar Square, Vilnius, Hansaplatz and 30 Rockefeller Plaza location pages.

It’s officially December, which means Christmas trees will start popping up in living rooms around the world. The tradition of bringing a Christmas tree into the home can be traced back to 15th-century Germany, and the custom spread throughout the globe in the second half of the 1800s. Today, around 35 million Christmas trees are grown in America each year and 50 to 60 million are produced in Europe.

Historically, Christmas trees were almost exclusively harvested from wild forests. Now almost all trees are grown on commercial tree farms where they are cut after about 10 years of growth. Many Instagrammers around the world visited both farms and forests to find the perfect tree and shared their search on Instagram.

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instagram:

Weekend Hashtag Project: #WHPliquidlandscape

Weekend Hashtag Project is a series featuring designated themes & hashtags chosen by Instagram’s Community Team. For a chance to be featured on the Instagram blog, follow @instagram and look for a photo announcing the weekend’s project every Friday.

The goal this weekend is to take creative landscape photos that feature water. Some tips to get you started:

  • Keep an eye on the weather, as the environment will help set the mood for your shot. Sunny skies make for crisp photos, while grayer days tell a more somber story. As winter comes to the northern hemisphere, those in cold climates can also use the newly-forming ice to set a snowy scene.
  • Even if you don’t live near the ocean or within easy distance to a lake, you can still participate. Look for rivers, ponds, swimming pools or puddles to photograph.
  • There’s a lot of room for creativity when photographing landscapes with water. In addition to traditional landscape photography, think about the possibilities that slow-shutter techniques and reflection shots create.

PROJECT RULES: Please only add the #WHPliquidlandscape hashtag to photos taken over this weekend and only submit your own photographs to the project. Any image taken then tagged over the weekend is eligible to be featured right here Monday morning!

tobyharrimanphotography
tobyharrimanphotography:

Light From Bodie on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Literally.. these clouds are from Bodie Ghost Town. Got board and started playing around with some more compositing. I really liked the flow of this foreground from Marshall Beach on Thanksgiving, but the sky wasn’t doing it for me. So I decided to fix my issue :) Website | facebook | Google+ | Tumblr | Twitter | Flickr | 500px | Stipple | Vimeo | Behance

tobyharrimanphotography:

Light From Bodie on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Literally.. these clouds are from Bodie Ghost Town. Got board and started playing around with some more compositing. I really liked the flow of this foreground from Marshall Beach on Thanksgiving, but the sky wasn’t doing it for me. So I decided to fix my issue :)

Website | facebook | Google+ | Tumblr | Twitter | Flickr | 500px | Stipple | Vimeo | Behance

instagram

instagram:

Life Inside Yosemite National Park with @trevlee

For more photos and videos from an insider’s perspective of Yosemite, follow @trevlee on Instagram. To see more from visitors to the park, explore the Yosemite National Park location page.

After visiting California’s Yosemite National Park on a road trip through the western United States, Instagrammer Trevor Lee (@trevlee) knew he was hooked. “On our way back from San Francisco we visited Yosemite. We only spent a few hours there, but I had never seen such beauty.” With his memories of the park inspiring him, Trevor set out to find a way back to the park. Within the year, he left his native Ohio for a job working in Yosemite’s employee recreation department.

As part of his position, Trevor doesn’t just spend his workday in Yosemite—he lives within the park itself. “When I’m not working, I’m out exploring the endless Yosemite beauty. There is so much to do here and so many great people to experience it all with,” he explains.

During the US government shutdown in October of this year, Trevor was one of the few who had access to the park: “I still worked and lived in the park during the shutdown, but there weren’t any tourists! We all had the park to ourselves. During the sixteen days we were closed, I camped on Half Dome and Eagle Peak, hiked Mt. Hoffman and the Ledge Trail, and did countless other things that I could have never done if it wasn’t for the shutdown.”

Through his own photos and videos, Trevor shares moments from off the beaten path as a way to show his followers the beauty of being alone in nature. For those headed to Yosemite, Trevor has some advice for getting a unique shot: “To get a unique perspective of Yosemite takes effort: you need to go to places people don’t go, you need to hike long distances, and climb up rarely traveled routes. Great photos aren’t taken, they’re made, so you need to take risks and explore the unknown.”